Volume 10, Issue 43 (vol. 10, no. 43 2021)                   j.plant proc. func. 2021, 10(43): 75-83 | Back to browse issues page

XML Persian Abstract Print


Download citation:
BibTeX | RIS | EndNote | Medlars | ProCite | Reference Manager | RefWorks
Send citation to:

ghaemi A, najafi F, askari H. Reaction of Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradicea to different plantation cultures.. j.plant proc. func.. 2021; 10 (43) :75-83
URL: http://jispp.iut.ac.ir/article-1-1481-en.html
1- Department of plant Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Karazmi University, Post code: 15719-14911, Tehran, Iran.
2- Department of plant Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Karazmi University, Post code: 15719-14911, Tehran, Iran. , najafi_f@khu.ac.ir
3- Department of plant sciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of life sciences and Biotechnology, Shaid Beheshti University, Post code: 19839694411, Tehran, Iran.
Abstract:   (503 Views)
A study with complete randomized design block and three replications was carried out in greenhouse condition to examine the effects of inoculation of mycorrhiza fungi (Glomus intraradicea) and (Glomus mosseae) on growth indices, chlorophyll content, carotenoid, and protein of parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.), dill (Anethum graveolens L.), and celery (Apium graveolens L). The study was conducted in different experimental plantation environments (soil, sand and hydroponic). The highest colonization was seen in celery (100%) in sand culture and the lowest colonization was observed in parsley (33%) in hydroponic culture. There was no significant difference between the two fungi in terms of colonization and its effect on plant growth. Based on the effects of symbiosis of sand culture plants, some of the plants were selected randomly and transferred to hydroponic culture. The first week in the hydroponic culture was featured with a decreased colonization, which had no negative effect on the plant’s growth. The traits under consideration were significant at probability level of 5%. The results showed that the effect of colonization on plants’ growth was a function of growth culture and the host plant.
Full-Text [PDF 482 kb]   (57 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Research | Subject: others
Received: 2020/12/4 | Accepted: 2021/05/25 | Published: 2021/10/25

Send email to the article author


Rights and permissions
Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

© 2021 CC BY-NC 4.0 | Journal of Plant Process and Function

Designed & Developed by : Yektaweb